How can UX design benefit business?

Hi everyone 

Just a quick question about UX design. Has or is anyone using this within the community, if so could you explain how it can benefit businesses? 

Thanks

Ralph 

Parents
  • Hi Ralph 

    The design and tech world is full of jargon, and UX is a classic. Firstly, what actually is UX? In broad terms, good UX design curates and optimises your brand’s and your users ‘desire path.’ It’s a term normally applied to digital design practice, but UX and CX can extend to any brand/consumer touchpoint. Simply put, your UX approach defines the ‘experience’ you want users to have when they interact with your brand's products and experiences. Even if you're not immediately aware of the term ‘desire paths’ , most of us have seen this phenomenon. They can be found everywhere, but one of the best places to see them is in parks. Stay with me. City planners route paths to neatly skirt a park’s perimeter, perhaps taking in a fountain or a flower bed along the way. These paths reflect their educated guess at what you want to see (or, more accurately, what they want you to see and in the order they want you to see it). In contrast, a 'desire path' serves as the people's edit - a short-cut, the path of least resistance, their optimised journey. These desire paths serve as unfiltered feedback of what is truly important to those park goers - that neatly trodden path of flattened earth that runs direct through A to B, offering the shortest and most natural route. Here’s the link… You have probably experienced a circuitous path (metaphorically) in poorly designed business websites and digital services. But, unlike grass, websites don't allow for short cuts - and this leads to frustration, confusion and less than optimal user experiences
    (UX). If you are a town planner, discovering that your designed path isn’t optimal is a mere annoyance. But in the world of ecommerce, this same oversight translates directly to lost sales - a critical failure. For customer services platforms, expect your users to reach you already aggravated. And, in the realm of digital healthcare, a circuitous path isn’t just an inconvenience, it can be a serious, even hazardous barrier for users seeking urgent help. Understanding your users' desired path. There is a scientific term for digital design without user testing - it's called ‘guesswork’. Whilst
    it's wonderfully freeing as a designer to be open and creative, design without direct end user empathy is highly risky.
    Unless you know for certain that the journey you want your users to come on is the one they are actually looking for - you risk missing the mark. So, start with understanding the job to be done, get a team of experts (your users, not your design team) and start working together to find that desire path. to find out more about my business Rodd Design, which supports innovative brands design consumer experiences please visit https://rodd.uk.com/

Reply
  • Hi Ralph 

    The design and tech world is full of jargon, and UX is a classic. Firstly, what actually is UX? In broad terms, good UX design curates and optimises your brand’s and your users ‘desire path.’ It’s a term normally applied to digital design practice, but UX and CX can extend to any brand/consumer touchpoint. Simply put, your UX approach defines the ‘experience’ you want users to have when they interact with your brand's products and experiences. Even if you're not immediately aware of the term ‘desire paths’ , most of us have seen this phenomenon. They can be found everywhere, but one of the best places to see them is in parks. Stay with me. City planners route paths to neatly skirt a park’s perimeter, perhaps taking in a fountain or a flower bed along the way. These paths reflect their educated guess at what you want to see (or, more accurately, what they want you to see and in the order they want you to see it). In contrast, a 'desire path' serves as the people's edit - a short-cut, the path of least resistance, their optimised journey. These desire paths serve as unfiltered feedback of what is truly important to those park goers - that neatly trodden path of flattened earth that runs direct through A to B, offering the shortest and most natural route. Here’s the link… You have probably experienced a circuitous path (metaphorically) in poorly designed business websites and digital services. But, unlike grass, websites don't allow for short cuts - and this leads to frustration, confusion and less than optimal user experiences
    (UX). If you are a town planner, discovering that your designed path isn’t optimal is a mere annoyance. But in the world of ecommerce, this same oversight translates directly to lost sales - a critical failure. For customer services platforms, expect your users to reach you already aggravated. And, in the realm of digital healthcare, a circuitous path isn’t just an inconvenience, it can be a serious, even hazardous barrier for users seeking urgent help. Understanding your users' desired path. There is a scientific term for digital design without user testing - it's called ‘guesswork’. Whilst
    it's wonderfully freeing as a designer to be open and creative, design without direct end user empathy is highly risky.
    Unless you know for certain that the journey you want your users to come on is the one they are actually looking for - you risk missing the mark. So, start with understanding the job to be done, get a team of experts (your users, not your design team) and start working together to find that desire path. to find out more about my business Rodd Design, which supports innovative brands design consumer experiences please visit https://rodd.uk.com/

Children
No Data